Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Afrodisia


Melanin Monroe


That Melanin Tho


The Elliptical

I'm editing my short story, The Elliptical because I want to add more depth and sympathy to Robbie, since after all, Robbie is loosely based on myself, and The Elliptical is a fantastical revenge fantasy story about a boy who wishes his father would return and rescue him from those who say they love him but treat him like they hate him;


“him;  

don’t forget the bottles  
of muscatel clanking  
empty 

in yards of  broken champagne flute glasses  
and lost memories of celebratory toasts; 
empty.  
slobbering stammering and stuttering a language; 
the ‘C’ word. 
in a pitch low enough that  only other alcoholics can interpret.  
in a pitch high enough that only other dogs can hear…”  



The Effects Of him, 
              by Alieux Casey-George



But I also have an idea for a new short story, that I can't wait until I'm done with  The Elliptical, to start on. It's a kafkaesque version of one of my favorite childhood tv shows, The Courtship of Eddie's Father. 

Do you hold grudges?

Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die. Author unknown.

  I don't hold grudges. I'll quickly forgive what people do, but I don't forget. If you grab a piece of charcoal and realize it's hot, and you drop it (like it's hot) are you going to forget it's hot and grab it again?

 Do you hold grudges? 

Whatever happened to Lindsey?


click here

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Song in my head

Who am I?

"For every confidence, there's someone willing to betray it."

I  was watching a movie on tv about a woman who discovered she had been adopted as a child. Her husband found a private investigator, and then immediately after the next commercial break, she had the address of her mother. She was amazed at how quickly the private investigator was able to find her mother, but then again, she knew her mother's full name. After eventually talking to her mother ( who had initially hidden behind a locked door when the woman showed up) she talked to the private investigator about how her adoption was a secret, and he said 'for every confidence, there's someone willing to betray it.'

My adoption was a secret. It's still a secret since no one alive will tell me anything about who I was before I became a casey and how the caseys 'attained' me. My records are sealed by the state of New York for some unknown reason. My private investigator told me that it is impossible to access my records. I know that movie was just a movie and not real life, but that sentence made me feel some kind of way:

For every confidence, there's someone willing to betray it.

I don't have the kind of money one would need to pay to betray a confidence, unfortunately. One attorney did tell me to write a letter to the Governor of New York, and to make it a really sad sob story.  I did that.  In early 2015.  It's almost Christmas, 2016, and I still don't know anything.

My records are sealed by the state of New York. I wonder why. What makes me to so 'special' that my birth records would need to be sealed? I wonder if my parents were famous and/or rich?

I'm too broke to research this at the moment, but as soon as I get my money right, I'm going to start again.




I'll set this right here, and walk away-


I know someone who has told the same lie so often that they can't even remember if it's the truth (and their favorite complaint about people is that they hate liars more than anything).

Janet Jackson- On getting down, getting up, getting through, and getting over.



#janet, #janetjackson, #nasty #missjacksonifyourenasty

The Boris and Nicole Show clip Salli & Dondre Whitfield

ABFF "FOR THE LOVE" feat. Salli Richardson-Whitfield

yeah, the only celebrity I love almost as much as Halle

The Best Thing I heard recently


From my friend Bilal and his wife Tahira-

"Alieux, while looking for a wife, you really need to try to adopt. You're a great guy and you'd be a great father. You are depriving yourself of the fatherhood I know you desire. There are lots of young black boys that could use someone like you in their lives. You don't have to be someone's husband to be a dad."

I teared up when I heard that.


This.

I saw the tail end of The View today, and I saw that Whoopi Goldberg had on this sweater. I had to google it immediately and I saw that it was available on Amazon.com, for $24.99 USD and they had it in my size! So I bought it. I'm wearing it to any Christmas parties to which I am invited.


Monday, November 28, 2016

By the way...

If you're looking for something new to download on your kindle (or kindle app, available on iphones through the app store)


is available on the Amazon Kindle Store,
as well as the following




#amazonkindle, #amazon #kindle

A Facebook Quote

“A person without a sense of humor is like a wagon without springs. It's jolted by every pebble on the road.”
― Henry Ward Beecher

I love this quote because I can relate to it. I think it's easier to be around someone-it makes it less awkward to be around someone who is funny, and can laugh at things and at themselves.  I remember once, a coworker  approached me, saying, "Alieux, say something, anything.  I'm having a bad day. You always make me laugh, even internally."  It never even occurred to me before that moment, that I had that effect on someone, and from that moment, I try (sometimes failing, but if you know me, you know my heart) as best as I can to be the type of person that people like to be around.  Who wants to be around a stick in the mud?  I know I don't!

Jazmine Sullivan - Need U Bad

Je Suis Serieux

Je suis tellement motivé et inspiré de faire assez d'argent pour quitter Portland.Tu n'as aucune idée!




I took this picture myself, from underneath the Tour Eiffel!

Soul Cypher 2015

Sunday, November 27, 2016

WTF moment

This advertisement showed up in my email inbox the day before Thanksgiving. I'm just seeing it for the first time today. I'm kind of speechless.
Collard Greens, a cheap leafy staple of soul food cuisine is being sold by Neiman Marcus ( whom we call Needless Markup) as a gourmet food item, for $66 plus the  shipping charge of $15.50?

I make collard greens often, and the total ingredients I can get for about $15.50 total.

I saw a post on Facebook a few minutes ago that said it was sold out.

Can we not have anything to ourselves without it being culturally appropriated? DAMN!

What next? Chittlins ?


What is Afrodisia?

This is my little corner of the blogosphere. This blog is dedicated to all those wonderful people whose heart beats to the rhythm of the soul. A place holder for discussions around music, afrocentric pop culture, Christianity, spirituality, politics, black love, and the black family. The idea is for everyone visiting this site to take away at least one happy moment that might make your day a teeny bit more interesting. Feel free to not just look at the current postings but the past postings as well, and offer your opinions and comments.

ok?


Keeping hope alive

So,

I joined Blackpeoplemeet the other day. To join was free; it allows you to view other profiles, but in order to message the women you're interested in, you have to pay. I saw three women I wanted to message. I also noticed that 38 women sent me a flirt, and 14 sent me an email. In order for me to respond to the flirts and emails I have to pay. Every one of the flirts or emails were  older than me, the youngest older than me by 5 years. I'm going to guess that no one reads profiles to see what people are looking for except myself.
So I paid to be able to message the 3 women I saw initially. I only paid for the one-month plan. Within 24 hours, all three women viewed my message. No one responded but two of them blocked me.
I'm going to keep hope alive.
I have no other choice. 

I guess nobody ever told you, all you must hold onto, is you, is you, is you.

The prettiest thing




           A smile is the prettiest thing you can wear



Friday, November 25, 2016

What Have You Done For Me (or others) Lately?

“The things you do for yourself are gone when you are gone, but the things you do for others remain as your legacy.” 
― Kalu Ndukwe Kalu

I bake alot. I love baking. It gives me great pleasure to knock on my neighbor's door with a cake, or pie or cookies, or bacon biscuits.  It gives them pleasure too.  It also gives me pleasure buying gifts for my God daughter, and not just for her birthday or Christmas. When I see something and she pops in my head, I have to buy it and send it to her. I like when she calls me, excited about what arrived in the mail. I appreciate her mom telling me how thoughtful I am. I love giving the things I love, and to the people that I love.

What have you done for me (or others)lately?



What I want


What I want for Christmas costs at least $68, 753 CAD annually:

A job. 

And a date with a woman beautiful and kind on the inside and out.

And some writing success.

And some baking success. 

Who knows- maybe I could be so successful at writing and/or baking that I wouldn't need a job.  After all, I made good money the past 24 hours ( and will make more between today and tomorrow morning) receiving Thanksgiving orders for cakes and pies and cookies. I've been busy the past 48 hours and I love it. 

Please, God,

I know You're working behind the scenes and I will triumph. 

You know the desires of my heart.

I'm thanking You in advance.

Amen. 

Just thinking outloud.

Even before donald was crowned the president-elect, I've thought about leaving the United States and moving to Canada. I've been kind of hesitant. His presidency makes it urgent. My desire to get married and have children grows more stronger, and, I refuse to raise children in a country of which donald is president.
Initially I was hesitant, but there was no rationale behind the hesitancy; I was thinking about my friend Ron. After a few years, he has officially renounced his US Citizenship. As of last week, he is officially a French Citizen.  I wouldn't want to be that far from my family and friends. That was my excuse. Ron's parents and his siblings have all passed away, and he has no family in the US. He raised a good point; he said that anyone who wants to see him can just fly to Paris to visit. When he said that, I thought about my family, all of whom live in Wisconsin.  I have lived in Oregon for 9 years and almost 2 months. I've invited them, but no one has visited me, not once. No one. I have to do all the visiting. Even when I lived in Maryland 19 years ago and lived there 3 yrs, my family never visited me. As far as my family is concerned, I could live in Africa or Australia and not tell them I've moved and they wouldn't even know. So, like Ron said, why not move to where you want to live?
So, I'm job-hunting here in the Pacific Northwest, the Wisconsin area, but also, in Toronto. I'd miss my friends though. I do have friends I hang out with alot.

Dear God,

I'll leave this here for You.

Thank you.

Amen.



What are you listening to?

A Tribe Called Quest- We Got It From Here. ..Thank U 4 Your Service. 

Current faves- Mobius, and The Donald

 Bruno Mars- 24K Magic
Current faves -Calling all my lovelies (featuring HALLE BERRY), Chunky, That's what I like, Perm

 Common- Black America Again
Current faves- Joy and Peace (featuring Bilal), Love Star ( featuring Marha Ambrosius), Unfamiliar, Letter to the free, The day Women took over

D'angelo and the Vanguard -Black Messiah
Faves- the entire cd  (this cd never leaves my playlist)


D'angelo- Voodoo
current faves- the entire cd. especially The Line  (this cd never leaves my playlist)

Dwele-Some Kinda
Current faves- the entire cd  (this cd never leaves my playlist)


 Solange- A Seat At The Table
Current faves- Cranes in the sky, FUBU. Don't Touch My Hair, Weary

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Did you know?

“Reality tastes like ashes” 
--Azereth Skivel

Remember what you were taught in grade school? Fleeing religious persecution, the Pilgrims sailed from England, landed on Plymouth rock over two months later, barely survived their first winter. With the help of Squanto and the friendly Wampanoag, who taught them how to exploit the local fish and game, plant corn and squash, and also protected them from other hostile tribes, the band of colonists succeeded in establishing a tenuous foothold at the edge of the North American wilderness. The first Thanksgiving in 1621 was held to celebrate a bountiful harvest with the tribe that helped make it possible.The real story, it turns out, is neither as simple nor as consoling as this pared down history would suggest. Not that the historians agree on what the real Thanksgiving story is. And it isn’t just historians who are squabbling over the significance of America’s feast day. It is ordinary Americans like— well—Rush Limbaugh for example, who are weighing in on the events of four hundred years ago.They did sit down and have free-range turkey and organic vegetables, Rush allows, “but it was not the Indians... it was capitalism and Scripture which saved the day.” And it wasn’t just a bitter winter and shortage of food that imperiled Pilgrim survival; it was, you guessed it, socialism, and those commune dwelling hippie Pilgrims themselves.The popular talk radio host blames the Pilgrim’s communal work ethic and equal sharing of the fruits of their labors for the colony’s rocky first year in which half of the one hundred settlers perished of starvation and disease—
“The most creative and industrious people had no incentive to work any harder than anyone else, unless they could utilize the power of personal motivation!”The tide turned, according to Rush, when the colony’s governor, William Bradford, assigned a private plot of land to each family, thereby setting loose the beneficent powers of the marketplace in the People’s Republic of Plymouth Rock.This revisionist history is greeted with bemusement by professional historians. But Limbaugh is not alone in using Thanksgiving to score some political points. While Thanksgiving’s enthusiasts view it as a celebration of the boldness, piety and sacrifices of the first European migrants to American shores, the holiday’s critics claim that it whitewashes the genocide and ethnic cleansing of indigenous people.If you happen to spend Thanksgiving in Plymouth Massachusetts this year, you can choose between two public commemorations. You can watch the official parade, in which townspeople dressed like pilgrims march to Plymouth Rock bearing blunderbusses and beating drums. Or you can stand on the top of Coles Hill with indigenous people and their supporters and fast in observance of what they call a "national day of mourning" in remembrance of the destruction of Indian culture and peoples.These two events represent radically different visions of American history. The official version, the one we learn in school, essentially starts with the landing of the Mayflower in 1620 in a small bay north of Cape Cod. In the Native version, on the other hand, the appearance of the Pilgrims on American shores marks the beginning of the end.In fact, the end times began for Massachusetts Indians several years earlier, when British slaving crews inadvertently introduced smallpox— carried by their infected cattle— to coastal New England killing over ninety percent of the local population, who lacked antibodies to fight the disease. (Compare this astonishing figure to the 30 percent death rates at the height of the Black Plague.)While the decimated Wampanoag helped the British boat people survive their first harrowing year, Native Americans say that the favor was not returned. A group which calls itself “The United American Indians of New England” alleges that in return for Indian generosity, Pilgrims stole their grain stores and robbed Wampanoag .The historical evidence for grave robbing is a bit thin. And perhaps we can forgive the starving Pilgrims for pilfering a little Indian corn. In any event, this petty thieving doubtless ended with their first ample harvest, which was celebrated with a three day feast. It remains an open question, however, whether the Wampanoag were actually invited, or if they crashed the party, as some historians now suggest, when they heard gunfire from the stockaded village and came to check out what the commotion was all about.There is also the much debated question of what was on the menu. There is no evidence for turkey, it turns out, only some kind of wild fowl— likely geese and duck— venison, corn mush and stewed pumpkin, or traditional Wampanoag succotash. Cranberries, though native to the region, would have been too tart for desert, and sweet potatoes were not yet grown in North America, though grapes and melons would have been available.The notion that the first Thanksgiving was some kind of cross-cultural love-fest, as it has been portrayed, is also disputed by historians, who say that the settlers and the Indians were brought together less by genuine friendship than by the extremity of their mutual need. The two struggling communities were never more than wary allies against other tribes.The colonists were contemptuous of the Indians, who they regarded as uncivilized and satanic heathens, and the fragile early peace between Native Americans and the early settlers would soon unravel in a horrific manner in what is now Mystic Connecticut, where the Pequot tribe was celebrating their own Thanksgiving, the green corn festival. In the predawn hours, settlers— not the Pilgrims, but a band of Puritans— descended on their village and shot, clubbed and burned alive over 700 native men, woman and children. This slaughter, according to Robert Jensen, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin, was the real origin of Thanksgiving— so proclaimed in 1637 by Massachusetts Bay Governor John Winthrop in gratitude for God’s destruction of the defenseless Pequot village. Thereafter massacres of the Indians were routinely followed by “days of thanksgiving.”Some blogosphere historians have gone so far as to claim that it was in order to consolidate this plethora of macabre feasts that George Washington made his Thanksgiving Day Proclamation in 1789. In reality, our first president’s aim was not to celebrate the genocide against the Indians, but to pay tribute to the survival of the fledgling but still imperiled nation. Nevertheless, troubling questions about the origins of our national feast remain.Jane Kamensky, a professor of history at Brandeis University, wondered on the website Common-Place (in 2001) whether it makes sense to stir up the historical pot, “to plumb the bottom of it all - to determine whether the first Thanksgiving was merely a pretext for bloodshed, enslavement, and displacement that would follow in later decades.”
“To ask whether this is true is to ask the wrong question. Thanksgiving is true to its purposes,” Kamensky writes, “And that’s all it needs to be. For these holidays say much less about who we really were in some specific Then, than about who we want to be in an ever changing Now.”It seems odd for a historian to argue that history doesn’t matter. A Thanksgiving which ignores the systematic destruction of Indian cultures which followed hot on the heels of the Plymouth feast not only does a disservice to indigenous peoples, it falsifies our understanding of ourselves and our history.While few would suggest that Thanksgiving should become the occasion for a yearly guilt trip, we would do well to remember the price the first Americans paid for European expansion into their territories as we sit around the bountiful table with our family and friends. Only by openly acknowledging the sins of our collective past, is it possible to proceed toward a future that all Americans can feel thankful for.

I posted this on my facebook page today. This will be one of these posts that will only be commented on by people who don't feel awkward reading the truth. Some people prefer to not have their dilusions destroyed.  

For some people, reality tastes like ashes.  

The truth after what is left over.

Some people feel awkward when they see Facebook posts that seem to destroy their delusions. They prefer to feel safe. They prefer to keep their head in the sand.

That's where I step in; to inform them of the truth in all its ugliness.

Case in point- Columbus Day and Thanksgiving. The truth isn't learned in school.

When I was in junior high school, I asked my history teacher, how could America have been discovered by Europeans when there were Indians already living here? I  also asked my teacher why the books don't state that Europeans brought bubonic plague, chicken pox, pneumonic plague, cholera, diptheria, influenza, measles, scarlet fever, smallpox, typhus, tuberculosis, and whooping cough ( my grandfather told me about this) ?
My teacher reported me to the principal who called my mother to come to the school to convince me to apologize to the teacher, and when I asked what I did wrong, my teacher and principal were pissed. And I got in trouble for speaking up.

Happy Thanksgiving.




Bilal - I Really Don't Care

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Beware


of the half truth. 

You may have gotten hold of the wrong half.



- author unknown. 


Did you know?

“Reality tastes like ashes” 
--Azereth Skivel

Remember what you were taught in grade school? Fleeing religious persecution, the Pilgrims sailed from England, landed on Plymouth rock over two months later, barely survived their first winter. With the help of Squanto and the friendly Wampanoag, who taught them how to exploit the local fish and game, plant corn and squash, and also protected them from other hostile tribes, the band of colonists succeeded in establishing a tenuous foothold at the edge of the North American wilderness. The first Thanksgiving in 1621 was held to celebrate a bountiful harvest with the tribe that helped make it possible.The real story, it turns out, is neither as simple nor as consoling as this pared down history would suggest. Not that the historians agree on what the real Thanksgiving story is. And it isn’t just historians who are squabbling over the significance of America’s feast day. It is ordinary Americans like— well—Rush Limbaugh for example, who are weighing in on the events of four hundred years ago.They did sit down and have free-range turkey and organic vegetables, Rush allows, “but it was not the Indians... it was capitalism and Scripture which saved the day.” And it wasn’t just a bitter winter and shortage of food that imperiled Pilgrim survival; it was, you guessed it, socialism, and those commune dwelling hippie Pilgrims themselves.The popular talk radio host blames the Pilgrim’s communal work ethic and equal sharing of the fruits of their labors for the colony’s rocky first year in which half of the one hundred settlers perished of starvation and disease—
“The most creative and industrious people had no incentive to work any harder than anyone else, unless they could utilize the power of personal motivation!”The tide turned, according to Rush, when the colony’s governor, William Bradford, assigned a private plot of land to each family, thereby setting loose the beneficent powers of the marketplace in the People’s Republic of Plymouth Rock.This revisionist history is greeted with bemusement by professional historians. But Limbaugh is not alone in using Thanksgiving to score some political points. While Thanksgiving’s enthusiasts view it as a celebration of the boldness, piety and sacrifices of the first European migrants to American shores, the holiday’s critics claim that it whitewashes the genocide and ethnic cleansing of indigenous people.If you happen to spend Thanksgiving in Plymouth Massachusetts this year, you can choose between two public commemorations. You can watch the official parade, in which townspeople dressed like pilgrims march to Plymouth Rock bearing blunderbusses and beating drums. Or you can stand on the top of Coles Hill with indigenous people and their supporters and fast in observance of what they call a "national day of mourning" in remembrance of the destruction of Indian culture and peoples.These two events represent radically different visions of American history. The official version, the one we learn in school, essentially starts with the landing of the Mayflower in 1620 in a small bay north of Cape Cod. In the Native version, on the other hand, the appearance of the Pilgrims on American shores marks the beginning of the end.In fact, the end times began for Massachusetts Indians several years earlier, when British slaving crews inadvertently introduced smallpox— carried by their infected cattle— to coastal New England killing over ninety percent of the local population, who lacked antibodies to fight the disease. (Compare this astonishing figure to the 30 percent death rates at the height of the Black Plague.)While the decimated Wampanoag helped the British boat people survive their first harrowing year, Native Americans say that the favor was not returned. A group which calls itself “The United American Indians of New England” alleges that in return for Indian generosity, Pilgrims stole their grain stores and robbed Wampanoag .The historical evidence for grave robbing is a bit thin. And perhaps we can forgive the starving Pilgrims for pilfering a little Indian corn. In any event, this petty thieving doubtless ended with their first ample harvest, which was celebrated with a three day feast. It remains an open question, however, whether the Wampanoag were actually invited, or if they crashed the party, as some historians now suggest, when they heard gunfire from the stockaded village and came to check out what the commotion was all about.There is also the much debated question of what was on the menu. There is no evidence for turkey, it turns out, only some kind of wild fowl— likely geese and duck— venison, corn mush and stewed pumpkin, or traditional Wampanoag succotash. Cranberries, though native to the region, would have been too tart for desert, and sweet potatoes were not yet grown in North America, though grapes and melons would have been available.The notion that the first Thanksgiving was some kind of cross-cultural love-fest, as it has been portrayed, is also disputed by historians, who say that the settlers and the Indians were brought together less by genuine friendship than by the extremity of their mutual need. The two struggling communities were never more than wary allies against other tribes.The colonists were contemptuous of the Indians, who they regarded as uncivilized and satanic heathens, and the fragile early peace between Native Americans and the early settlers would soon unravel in a horrific manner in what is now Mystic Connecticut, where the Pequot tribe was celebrating their own Thanksgiving, the green corn festival. In the predawn hours, settlers— not the Pilgrims, but a band of Puritans— descended on their village and shot, clubbed and burned alive over 700 native men, woman and children. This slaughter, according to Robert Jensen, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin, was the real origin of Thanksgiving— so proclaimed in 1637 by Massachusetts Bay Governor John Winthrop in gratitude for God’s destruction of the defenseless Pequot village. Thereafter massacres of the Indians were routinely followed by “days of thanksgiving.”Some blogosphere historians have gone so far as to claim that it was in order to consolidate this plethora of macabre feasts that George Washington made his Thanksgiving Day Proclamation in 1789. In reality, our first president’s aim was not to celebrate the genocide against the Indians, but to pay tribute to the survival of the fledgling but still imperiled nation. Nevertheless, troubling questions about the origins of our national feast remain.Jane Kamensky, a professor of history at Brandeis University, wondered on the website Common-Place (in 2001) whether it makes sense to stir up the historical pot, “to plumb the bottom of it all - to determine whether the first Thanksgiving was merely a pretext for bloodshed, enslavement, and displacement that would follow in later decades.”
“To ask whether this is true is to ask the wrong question. Thanksgiving is true to its purposes,” Kamensky writes, “And that’s all it needs to be. For these holidays say much less about who we really were in some specific Then, than about who we want to be in an ever changing Now.”It seems odd for a historian to argue that history doesn’t matter. A Thanksgiving which ignores the systematic destruction of Indian cultures which followed hot on the heels of the Plymouth feast not only does a disservice to indigenous peoples, it falsifies our understanding of ourselves and our history.While few would suggest that Thanksgiving should become the occasion for a yearly guilt trip, we would do well to remember the price the first Americans paid for European expansion into their territories as we sit around the bountiful table with our family and friends. Only by openly acknowledging the sins of our collective past, is it possible to proceed toward a future that all Americans can feel thankful for.

I posted this on my facebook page today. This will be one of these posts that will only be commented on by people who don't feel awkward reading the truth. Some people prefer to not have their dilusions destroyed.  

For some people, reality tastes like ashes.  

Saturday, November 19, 2016

Genesis 1:26-27

26 Then God said, “Let us make mankind in our image, in our likeness, so that they may rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky, over the livestock and all the wild animals,[a] and over all the creatures that move along the ground.”
27 So God created mankind in his own image,
    in the image of God he created them;
    male and female he created them.


Question-who was God talking to?  A guy stopped me at the mall and began talking about God. I thought he was a Mormon but he wasn't. When he pulled out the Bible, I decided I would listen to what he had to say, and he showed me the Bible verses above, just after he asked if I knew about God the Mother as well as God the Father.  I believe what I believe, but I have to admit that the question the guy  asked me left me dumbfounded.  I've read the book of Genesis many many many times in my life, and I never even thought about the sentence in the 26th verse. I'm going to ask my best friend, who is an Episcopalian Priest, and the most knowledgeable Christian I know, and I'll add his response to another post.  

Got privilege?

Tough times we're living in.

Following donald's win, racists are being bold with their racism, celebrating the only way they know how; gloating and yelling at people of color, calling them niggers, beating them up, setting homes and businesses on fire, spray painting swastikas, etc.

Tough times we're living in, in America. Land of the brave, home of the free.

This picture alone is the definition of white privilege.

Power. More now than ever.

BLACK POWER

Who do you love?

Someone in a  facebook group of which I'm a part, called Baecations, asked the question- name 5 things that you love. It could be about you, hobbies, interests, etc.

My response was: 

 I love God, I love my family, my friends, my birth mother even though I never met her and don't even know her name or if she is even alive, hearing children laugh, Paris, my cat Isaiah, black men and women in graduation cap and gowns, black love, a father with his children, the weekly phone calls from my 8 yr old Goddaughter telling me about her week, baking for family and friends, money, sleeping, black women, etc.

In my response, I made sure to mention God first, for He is the first to everything in my life. Without Him, nothing and no one else could exist. 


So, I'll ask, who or what do you love?


It just occurred to me that I forgot to include myself in the above. I love my self. 


God first though. 



Sunday, November 13, 2016

Goodie Mob - Cell Therapy

From this point on,

I vow to not only not mention the name of the president-elect, but also, to never post a pic of him on this blog.
I can't bring myself to live in a country that would choose him as president. It's unfathomable to me.
I'm currently seeking a visa from Canada.

Saturday, November 12, 2016

I'm just saying

I always hear that everything comes back to you. Well, I'm prepared because I've been better to people than they are to me, and I'm looking forward to good finally coming to me because my life has sucked awfully. I just hope I don't have to wait until my next life.
I'm convinced that in a past life (or lives) I must have been the worst kind of asshole to everyone involved- to girlfriends and wives and children and parents etc., which is why I am intentionally good to people in this life-though I think I'm naturally a good person anyway.  I'm just saying. 

Friday, November 11, 2016

What happened on November 11?

It’s Veteran’s Day, also celebrated as Armistice Day or Remembrance Day in other parts of the world, falling on November 11, the anniversary of the signing of the Armistice that ended World War I. (Major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 with the German signing of the Armistice.


U.S. President Woodrow Wilson first proclaimed an Armistice Day for November 11, 1919. The United States Congress passed a concurrent resolution seven years later on June 4, 1926, requesting the President issue another proclamation to observe November 11 with appropriate ceremonies. An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday; "a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as 'Armistice Day'."     (courtesy of wikipedia.org)

and…

Nat Turner
Leader of a Virginia slave revolt, Nat Turner, was hanged in 1831,

The image converter for detecting electromagnetic radiation was patented by George R. Carruthers making him the first Black to do so, in 1969,

Angola became independent in 1975,

The Bethune Museum & Archives, a depository and center for African American women's history, is established in Washington, DC in 1979,

Civil Rights Memorial is dedicated in Montgomery, AL, 1989,             
George R. Carruthers


and

Calista Flockhart ,Kurt Vonnegut, Jonathan Winters, Fedor Dostoevsky, General George Patton, Charles Walgreen, Tyler Christopher Baker, Willie Parker, William Proxmire, Daniel Ortega, Barbara Boxer, Adam Beach, Maude Adams, Abigail Adams and Leonardo DiCaprio were all born November 11.

And

Demi Moore and I, both, were born today, 54 years ago.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Damn

Hillary won the popular vote by almost 200,000.  The difference was 47.7% and 47.5%, but the Electoral College chose a man who hates latinos/as, blacks, muslims, disrespects women, pows, the lgbt community, etc., and day one is planning on dismantling everything President Obama stood for and fought for, with no replacement in mind. Heaven help us.