Saturday, June 28, 2014

-Karriem Riggins




Wednesday, June 25, 2014

5 Years ago today

RIP Michael Jackson.

Do you remember the time?


Happy 30th Anniversary!

Purple Rain!



I loved this movie and soundtrack.  My favorite song on this cd was When Doves Cry.

What was yours?

Good morning

Good morning God, Jesus, and Holy Spirit... Thank you for waking me up this morning, and blessing me to see another day. I know some didn't wake up, so I thank you that I did. Dear Lord, I'm tired of praying for the same thing. Today I'll just ask you to please fulfill the desires of my heart and to lead me in a different path, assuming I'm on the wrong one. Thanking you in advance for what appears to be a miracle.

Thank you, Amen

4 Year Old Destroys Babysitter’s Plan To “Blame The Black Man” In Home Robbery

It’s no secret that “blame the black man” is a time honored tradition in America. And since there is still so much fear and suspicion that lingers when it comes to black men, it’s proven quite effective, even today, when you want to pin a crime on someone. But luckily, four year old Abby Dean of Whatcom County, Washington was there to save the day with her heroic honesty. As a child, it can be hard to speak truth to authority figures, hell even as an adult. But when Abby’s 17 year old babysitter claimed that her employer’s home had been burglarized by two black men, it was Abby who stepped forward to set the record straight. The extremely intelligent four year old told a Fox affiliate that “Wednesday was the worst day in my life.” She was there when the house was burglarized and told reporters that the robbers “… told us to get out of the house ’cause they wanted to steal stuff.” They stole a number of the employer’s belongings and Abby recalled that they nabbed her kitty bank, iPod, Xbox and Wii. When questioned by authorities the babysitter told police that one of the thieves looked like the next door neighbor, a black man. Cody Oaks, Dean’s neighbor, was handcuffed and questioned by police for hours until Abby chimed in to tell authorities the truth. She said,“It wasn’t the right skin color.” She said that the robbers were white and not black. Once Abby spoke up the babysitter’s edifice of lies started to topple and she confessed to the crime, admitting that it was her 16 year old boyfriend and another accomplice who had actually robbed the house. Abby’s mother said she’s very proud of her daughter, noting that within 30 seconds her admission changed the questioning scene which had been going on for five to six hours. Oaks, the neighbor, says what he finds troubling is the fact that the babysitter doesn’t realize the type of danger she could have potentially caused for him and his family and he hopes she learns from this situation. The babysitter and her two accomplices were arrested and may face robbery, burglary and perjury charges. Take a look at the video below of Abby explaining the ordeal to the news crew. Listening to her speak, it’s clear that the babysitter didn’t understand what type of child she was dealing with. This little girl is too sharp for the shenanigans and potentially life altering, bold-faced lies. I, as a black man, living in America, take this story personally. I know what it feels like to be falsely accused and having no one believe me. I am so thankful for that little girl speaking up. The babysitter could have ruined that man's life.

Sunday, June 22, 2014

Lauryn Hill asks,

Tell me who I have to be,  
to get some reciprocity?


Afrodisia


Aegria de viver!


The Ummah

The Ummah is a music production collective, composed of members Q-Tip and Ali Shaheed Muhammad of A Tribe Called Quest, and the late Jay Dee (also known as J Dilla) of the Detroit based group Slum Village. Occasional members include Raphael Saadiq, and D’Angelo. In addition to producing the entirety of A Tribe Called Quest’s fourth and fifth albums, The Ummah has provided backing tracks for a notable array of hip hop and R&B artists, including Busta Rhymes, Whitney Houston, Keith Murray, Brand New Heavies, Janet Jackson, and Jon B. The group is so named because two of its members (Tip and Ali) are devout Muslims. The word “ummah” is Arabic for “community” or “brotherhood”.

The collective took shape around 1995, when veteran keyboardist, Amp Fiddler, introduced Jay Dee (who at the time was shopping for a deal for his group) to Q-Tip. Although Tip wasn’t taken by Slum Village as a whole, he was impressed enough by Jay Dee’s deeply soulful productions to invite him as a permanent, although largely unseen, 4th member of A Tribe Called Quest. Their first work, Beats, Rhymes and Life, was criticized for moving away from the group’s earlier, more dense, and bottom heavy sound exemplified by tracks such as “(We’ve Got) Jazz” and “Oh My God”. The new sound which now leaned towards a more laid back, polished, tone would be embraced a little more with the release of Tribe’s “Find A Way” from their fifth and final album The Love Movement, although the album itself received a lukewarm reception, and no second proper single or video was released.

Following this, and the split of A Tribe Called Quest, Q-Tip and Jay Dee continued to collaborate under the ‘Ummah’ moniker, producing almost all of Tip’s solo venture Amplified, which included one track from DJ Scratch. For several reasons, including label complications, Tip has since remained inactive while Jay Dee and D’Angelo went on to form the Soulquarians with other like-minded artists. Although Tribe has since formed somewhat of a reunion, releasing ” ICU (Doin’ It)” in 2003, the possibility of them once again using the ‘Ummah’ name for future productions seems unlikely, especially since member Jay Dee’s death on February 10, 2006. 

Sunday, June 15, 2014

mr casey


Take some beatings.

Take them rough.

Take then till youve

Had enough.



Some  back hand face-slappings;

Thatll do.

Take them til youre

Black and blue.



Take a scalding.

Take it hot.

Take it til it

hurts to squat.


Take a poison
drink all of it 
 Take it 'til it
Hurts to shit.
 

Take many insults

But dont shed a tear

Therell be plenty plenty plenty more

Throughout the coming years



Take all of the above

And seal them with a kiss.

God bless you

If you can live through this.



Happy Father’s Day,
mr casey   

-alexgeorge 



                                           (My annual  father's day re-posting)



Take a  beating.
Take it rough.
Take it till youve
Had enough.

A face-slapping;
Thatll do.
Take it til youre
Black and blue

Take a scalding.
Take it hot.
Take it til it
hurts to squat.

Take many insults
But dont shed a tear
Therell be plenty more
Throughout the coming years

Take all of the above
And seal them with a kiss.
God bless you
If you can live through this.
- See more at: http://seville10.blogspot.com/search?q=live+through+this#sthash.5po9OEwx.dpuf

Friday, June 13, 2014

All in

Together Again


Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis

Ruby Dee dead at 91

Legendary stage and screen actress — and Civil Rights leader --frequently costarred with husband Ossie Davis

Dee died Wednesday at her New Rochelle home with her family at her side. The actress was born in Cleveland, raised in Harlem, and emerged in an era when African-American women remained second-class citizens on stage and screen.

The 91-year-old activist and actress, who died late Wednesday, will spend eternity with her late husband — their ashes co-mingled inside an urn bearing the words, “In This Thing Together.”
Dee, the epitome of grace, courage, style and class across seven decades of stardom, was flanked by two generations of family when she passed away at 10:30 p.m. in her suburban home.
“She very peacefully surrendered,” said her daughter Nora Day, standing Thursday on the back steps of her parents’ New Rochelle house. “We hugged her, we kissed her, we gave her our permission to go.     
               
“She opened her eyes. She looked at us. She closed her eyes, and she set sail.”
The Cleveland-born, Harlem-raised Dee emerged in an era when African-American women remained second-class citizens on stage and screen.
 She went on to earn an Emmy, a Grammy and a Screen Actors Guild Award, along with a 2008 Oscar nomination for playing the mother to Denzel Washington’s Harlem drug kingpin in “American Gangster.”
In 1965, she became the first African-American woman to perform a leading role at the American Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Conn.
The lights on Broadway will dim for 60 seconds at 7:45 p.m. Friday in her honor.

Though born Ruby Wallace, she kept her married surname even after divorcing her first husband, blues singer Frankie Dee, in the 1940s.
She and Davis collaborated for decades on art, activism and family. The duo has three children: blues musician Guy Davis, and two daughters, Nora Day and Hasna Muhammad.
All three, along with Dee’s seven grandchildren, were with the actress when she died.
“She’s off to her next gig,” said grandson Jihaad Muhammad, 32.
The couple raised eyebrows with an autobiography that advocated open marriage, saying that lies, not extramarital affairs, destroy marriages. The book was published in 1998, when the pair celebrated its 50th anniversary — a feat they self-deprecatingly credited “as much to luck as to love.”
A documentary on the couple’s trailblazing life and career, “Life’s Essentials with Ruby Dee,” debuts June 22 at the 18th Annual American Black Film Festival in Chelsea. It was directed by Dee and Davis’ grandson Muta’Ali.
With Nancy Dillon, Joe Neumaier, Simone Weichselbaum and Michael J. Feeney

Ruby Dee (with Sidney Poitier) starred in "A Raisin in the Sun" in 1961.


Ruby Dee gives a reading at the March on Washington in 1963.

Her career as an actress paralleled her work as an activist, often done with husband Davis at her side until his death in 2005.
She and Davis were close friends with both Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X, whose eulogy Davis gave in 1965 — two years after Dee delivered a stirring reading at King’s March on Washington.
In 2005, Dee and Davis received the National Civil Rights Museum’s Lifetime Achievement Freedom award. Six years earlier, both were arrested while protesting the police shooting of unarmed immigrant Amadou Diallo.
The two starred side-by-side in a pair of Spike Lee-directed films, “Do The Right Thing” and “Jungle Fever.” In all, they performed together in 11 plays and five films.
Dee’s first film role came in 1949’s musical drama “That Man of Mine.” She played Rachel Robinson in “The Jackie Robinson Story” in 1950, and co-starred opposite Nat King Cole, Eartha Kitt and Cab Calloway in “St. Louis Blues” in1958.
She appeared in the 1979 TV movie “Roots: The Next Generations,” and co-starred with Davis in their own short-lived 1980-81 show, “Ossie and Ruby!”
Dee was a frequent presence on New York stages for four decades, joining the American Negro Theatre in 1941 and making her Broadway debut two years later in “South Pacific.”
She starred opposite Davis in the 1946 play “Jeb,” and the two were wed in 1948.

In 1959, Dee starred in the Broadway premiere of “A Raisin in the Sun” as the wife of Sidney Poitier — and she reprised the role in the film eight years later.
Dee’s last Broadway performance was in the 1988 comedy “Checkmates,” which marked the debut of Washington.
The Oscar-winning actor is on the boards in Poitier’s role in “A Raisin in the Sun.”
Dee’s résumé of activism included membership in organizations including the Congress of Racial Equality, the NAACP, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Though born Ruby Wallace, she kept her married surname even after divorcing her first husband, blues singer Frankie Dee, in the 1940s.
She and Davis collaborated for decades on art, activism and family. The duo has three children: blues musician Guy Davis, and two daughters, Nora Day and Hasna Muhammad.
All three, along with Dee’s seven grandchildren, were with the actress when she died.
“She’s off to her next gig,” said grandson Jihaad Muhammad, 32.
The couple raised eyebrows with an autobiography that advocated open marriage, saying that lies, not extramarital affairs, destroy marriages. The book was published in 1998, when the pair celebrated its 50th anniversary — a feat they self-deprecatingly credited “as much to luck as to love.”
A documentary on the couple’s trailblazing life and career, “Life’s Essentials with Ruby Dee,” debuts June 22 at the 18th Annual American Black Film Festival in Chelsea. It was directed by Dee and Davis’ grandson Muta’Ali.
--courtesy, NY Daily News

 


Tuesday, June 10, 2014

10 Things I Wish I Had Done Differently


I know that hindsight is 20/20, but it doesn't hurt to dream, right?  I also know that, with some mistakes along the way, I've met some really cool people and I would hate to actually change the course of my life or the path because I would not have met them. But if I could go back in time I would--

  1. have had the self esteem to ignore my high school guidance counselor when she said I shouldn't go into Architecture because I wasn't smart enough. I ended up being the valedictorian of my high school.
  2. have doubted my mother when I was 8 and overheard a friend of my aunt referring to me as the boy Jean adopted ( I asked my mom about it and she lied to me and I believed her. I found out when I was  45 that I really was adopted).
  3. have spent the money I won from a lawsuit 15 yrs ago more wisely.
  4. had said yes to Calculus/Trigonometry in High School.
  5. had never quit my job at HUMANA.
  6. had never worked at northwestern mutual life (it was 3-year long nightmare)
  7. had stayed at Coventry Healthcare about a month longer (my boss from hell quit a month after me)
  8. had never worked at SegalCo. 
  9. had approached my grandparents and aunts about my suspicions of being adopted  before they passed away
  10. had taken more chances

 

/62\


Monday, June 9, 2014

Song in my head


I'm from Wisconsin too

I found a way to get people  in Oregon to  stop thinking I might be some angry unapproachable black man. My conversation piece is wearing a Wisconsin or Green Bay Packer T shirt on the weekends.  There are lots of Wisconsin transplants here, and people like seeing other people that are from their neck of the woods. I know that I like seeing people wearing Wisconsin T shirts or baseball caps.  Usually when I can't think of anything to say to strangers, I'm always glad to be able to tell Wisconsin natives that I'm from Wisconsin as well, then they tell me where they're from in the state, when they moved to Oregon, and then we both talk about how we don't miss the brutal winters there.   Over the weekend, I've had more conversations, more thumbs-ups, more comments about my clothing, than any other weekend here. Because I'm told by people who know me that I always look angry,  I made sure to smile and laugh and be as receptive and conversational as I could, when asked if I'm from Wisconsin. On saturday I was at a busy pancake restaurant, waiting for my number to called. As I sat in the lobby, seated across from me was a man, his wife and 4 sons. All of them avoided eye contact. except for the youngest kid. He was three. he pointed at my Green Bay Packer shirt. he walked over to me before his parents could stop him. He lifted his hand to give me a fist bump, and I responded promptly, smiling at him. It was then that his family, noticed I was wearing a Green Bay Packer Tshirt, because his father asked if I was from Wisconsin. We chatted for quite a while about our lives in the state. It was a nice conversation until my table was ready and I followed the employee to my seat.   I hope that they walked away with a good feeling, that looks can be deceiving. I'm perhaps the nicest person I know, but I'm told I look angry.

Thursday, June 5, 2014

I had a good day today. A really productive day. This morning I went to work and looked at everything at my desk that I needed to accomplish and I am happy to note that by 2 today it was all done. I had skipped lunch to take care of it, but the cafeteria closes at 4 so I could get something to eat afterwards.My new boss noticed that the Underwriting queue was full in the morning ( he talked of the need to manage the queue in a coworker's absence) and he came by at 3 to thank me for doing the work of  2 people. And while the computer was running queries, I looked at Facebook and saw that a friend listed all of her male friends-the decent ones, and made note of why each were decent. I was in the list. It made me smile. She also added a pic of me in a suit, informing people that I'm also a baker. I started thinking (praying and hoping) that at least one of her female friends would like what they saw and read and will message me or send a friend invite.
Oh yeah- I couldn't sleep the night before until after I crawled out of  bed to bake a cake. A Raspberry White Velvet Cake (with White Zinfadel) I brought it to work for the Sales department.    And they said it was my best cake so far. They say that with each cake though!



 

Look who's 50!



The First Lady,   Michelle Obama

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

#realshit

Asian Interviewer: "Can you address their concerns Mr.Chang?"
MR. CHANG: "The concerns of Black people? Yes I can. The fact is, that we all live under a system of White Supremacy. We Asian people look back at our long history of conflict with the European. We observe their strategies and develop our own, in response and in kind. There is no need for loud mass movements on our part, because we intend to overtake them in time, through action and personal sacrifice".
Asian INTERVIEWER: "And the Black man?"
MR. CHANG: "He does not count into our situation. He is simply here. We do not hate the Black man. We just love the Asian man most. Real love--not cliche. We want to see Asian man happy, so we employ him. We eat together. We spend time with each other. We want his kids to be educated, so we invest in our own schools that offer our children the technical abilities to change the world's power structure in our favor. We want to see the Asian man safe, so we purchase and organize our own communities. We want him to remain Asian, so we reduce the outside influence of others ideologies and cultures. While he fought to sniff behind the White man, the Black man has had the opportunity and every right in the world to do the same, but he chooses to indict people like me for not hiring him over my own brothers. For me to do this would be foolish and that would not be Asian love. In contrast, the Black man will fight for the right to be up under everyone else other than other Black people who he should feel the most love for. If our indifference to their situation make us racist, then what would you call the Black man's indifference to his own situation?" www.FarrahGray.com

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Nothing greater.

Today on OWN,   Oprah had broadcasted  back to back  Oprah Winfrey shows where Maya Angelou was a guest throughout the years, and I recorded all of them. I was watching Oprah's Legends Ball and Maya Angelou told the women there that there's nothing greater than thank you. That's what you say to God. I had been tearing up off and on since hearing of Maya Angelou's passing, but today when I heard her say .. thank you. That's what you say to God...- tears just fell for about a minute. Uncontrollable, heavy tears. I was on facebook when I heard it and I had to stop and thank God for all He's done for me.  And to be honest, I'm not sure why I was crying. I don't know if they were tears of thankfulness for all God has done for me, or tears because I'm sad that one of my most inspirational poets/writers in my life  had passed away, or a combination of both-


All we have to do

Our crown has already been bought and paid for. All we have to do is wear it.

--James Baldwin

Plain & simple


I don't believe God brought me this far (to Oregon) to leave me.



That is all.

Have a good day.